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Wednesday, March 16, 2016

#EXCERPT: Wishing Stone by Tegon Maus

Wishing Stone

Tegon MausWishing Stone by Tegon Maus

Publisher: Tirgearr Publishing (August 10, 2014)
Category: Mystery, Soft Science Fiction, Technothriller, Humor, Quirky
ASIN: B00MMQYLPU
Tour Date: Feb/Mar, 2016
 Available in: ebook, 151 Pages

During that last summer, as if in punishment for being happy, Kate was diagnosed with cervical cancer. The last time we used the wishing stone was at the hospital the morning she died. On that day, all three of us made a silent wish, certain the others had wished the same. Kate died that afternoon and I never thought about it again. It was the last time I believed in magic, in love or in the existence of God. Then, after three miserable lonely years, the unthinkable, a second chance . . . Warwick.

EXCERPT:

Excerpt 1 – The Wishing Stone
In the middle of the room stood a large machine of some sort.  Six large, blue cylinders, with thick cables and several hoses protruding out of their tops, made up the bulk of the apparatus.  At the bottom, each narrowed almost to a point, terminating in a black plastic square.  A rainbow of braided wire, jutted out of one side of the square before being taped to the side of each cylinder.  The wires trailed along the thicker cable until they connected to the back of a dull aluminum box.  More cables, attached to a computer, were tied to the opposite side of the aluminum box.  Below the cylinders was a flat, slanted table.
Roger stood with his hands in his pockets, shoulders slumped, staring at the contrivance.
"I'm sorry, my friend,"  Digby said softly, placing a gentle hand on his shoulder.  "I fixed it."
"Got it to work at last then?" Roger asked.  His voice held a sorrowful tone.
"I wish it had been in time," Digby said, patting him.
I didn't understand what was going on.  What was this machine?  What did it do?
"It looks... complicated," I offered trying to think of the right thing to say.
"It was Roger's design.  Digby finished it when Kate went into the hospital for the last time," Marcie answered, coming to my rescue.
"What does it do?" I asked, running a curious hand over the metal cylinders.
"It doesn't do anything... it makes," Digby said, lightly slapping my hand away from the apparatus.
"My mistake... what does it make?"
"Skin," he returned.
"I beg your pardon?"
"Skin," he repeated.
"Skin like..." I couldn't think of the right words to convey my curiosity.
"Yes, skin... people skin... like yours, like mine, like hers," he said with disinterest, pointing at Marcie.
"Well, not like my skin," Marcie countered.
"Oh, you're right.  I hadn't thought about that... wouldn't that be interesting.  Yes?" Digby exclaimed, covering his mouth with his fingers.  He stood for a moment looking to the ceiling, his fingers drumming over his half open moutExcerpt 1 – The Wishing Stone
In the middle of the room stood a large machine of some sort.  Six large, blue cylinders, with thick cables and several hoses protruding out of their tops, made up the bulk of the apparatus.  At the bottom, each narrowed almost to a point, terminating in a black plastic square.  A rainbow of braided wire, jutted out of one side of the square before being taped to the side of each cylinder.  The wires trailed along the thicker cable until they connected to the back of a dull aluminum box.  More cables, attached to a computer, were tied to the opposite side of the aluminum box.  Below the cylinders was a flat, slanted table.
Roger stood with his hands in his pockets, shoulders slumped, staring at the contrivance.
"I'm sorry, my friend,"  Digby said softly, placing a gentle hand on his shoulder.  "I fixed it."
"Got it to work at last then?" Roger asked.  His voice held a sorrowful tone.
"I wish it had been in time," Digby said, patting him.
I didn't understand what was going on.  What was this machine?  What did it do?
"It looks... complicated," I offered trying to think of the right thing to say.
"It was Roger's design.  Digby finished it when Kate went into the hospital for the last time," Marcie answered, coming to my rescue.
"What does it do?" I asked, running a curious hand over the metal cylinders.
"It doesn't do anything... it makes," Digby said, lightly slapping my hand away from the apparatus.
"My mistake... what does it make?"
"Skin," he returned.
"I beg your pardon?"
"Skin," he repeated.
"Skin like..." I couldn't think of the right words to convey my curiosity.
"Yes, skin... people skin... like yours, like mine, like hers," he said with disinterest, pointing at Marcie.
"Well, not like my skin," Marcie countered.
"Oh, you're right.  I hadn't thought about that... wouldn't that be interesting.  Yes?" Digby exclaimed, covering his mouth with his fingers.  He stood for a moment looking to the ceiling, his fingers drumming over his half open mouth.

 Praise for Machines of the Little People (The Eve Project- Book 1)

"The plot is unique, I must say that I haven't read a Sci Fi book so original in a long time. It has everything, mystery, suspense, romance, eccentric characters, conspiracy theories, and of course the little people with their machines! Crazy, Wild, Excellent Written. Highly Recommended!!!"- Julia Damatto, Romorror Fan Girl
 "the real joy of this book is not the plot itself. The real joy is the way in which Maus keeps his readers constantly off guard, stringing them along for pages before flipping the situation on its head and forcing readers to reevaluate whatever they thought they knew. Normally, that just pisses me off, but the way Maus manipulates his readers makes us squeal with delight at every turn. There is an energy to his novels, a sense of urgency tinged with wonder. We trust that wherever he takes us--and it won't be somewhere we expect--it will be an adventure in the truest sense of the word. And then we have the characters. At the end of the day, it's the characters that make a Maus book what it is. Definitely recommended for anyone who just wants a cracking good story. "-Jonathan Cook, Author 'Youth and Other Fictions'
 "Anyone who loves a good science fiction/fantasy story would have a hard time putting this one down."- Lisa Binion, Author 'Softly and Tenderley'

Praise for Wishing Stone (The Eve Project- Book 2)

"More great Sci-Fi adventure from Tegon Maus. He doesn't just give us a good Sci-Fi story. He gives us a story with great characters and a unique story and is able to include many other genres in his Sci-Fi stories. Comedy, drama and action. Let's pray for a book three in the series."-Erik Nelson, Author 'Unlawful Protection'
 "This is a great science fiction story, which follows on nicely from The Eve Project: Book 1, Machines of the Little People, however could easily be read as a stand-alone. It has it all for science fiction fans, top secret scientific projects, a great storyline, twists and turns round every corner, yet, at its very core lies, dare I say it, a love story. It has a great finish, however, at the end, all I wanted to know from the author – is there is another book in the series coming? I hope so"-Susan Keefe, Author 'Toby's Tales' Series
 "I enjoyed The Wishing Stone even more than the first book, even though, again, it's not my usual read. I really liked the eccentric scientist characters Ben meets at Warwick, and as with book one, Tegon Maus did a great job of keeping me guessing what was really going on right to the very end. I look forward to finding out what book 3 has in store!"-Nick Stead, Author 'Hybrid'



Tegon MausAbout Tegon Maus

Tegon Maus was raised pretty much the same as everyone else… devoted mother, strict father and all the imaginary friends he could conjure. Not that he wasn’t friendly, he just wasn’t “people orientated”. Maybe he lived in his head way more than he should have, maybe not. He liked machines more than people, at least he did until I met his wife. The first thing he can remember writing was for her. For the life of him he can’t remember what it was about… something about dust bunnies under the bed and monsters in my closet. It must have been pretty good because she married him shortly after that. He spent a good number of years chasing other dreams before he got back to writing. It wasn’t a deliberate conscious thought, it was more of a stepping stone. His wife and himself had joined a dream interpret group and we were encouraged to write down our dreams as they occurred. “Be as detailed as you can,” we were told. He was thrilled. If there is one thing he enjoys it’s making people believe him and he likes to exaggerate. Not a big exaggeration or an outright lie mind you, just a little step out of sync, just enough so you couldn’t be sure if it were true or not. When he writes, he always write with the effort of “it could happen” very much in mind and nothing, he guarantees you, nothing, makes him happier. He has consistently placed in the top 3 in 189 writing contest in a variety of genres and has been featured in magazines a couple of times to raise money for Saint Jude’s Children’s Hospital.
 Tegon Maus Website: http://www.tegonmaus.com/
Author on Tirgearr Website: http://tirgearrpublishing.com/authors/Maus_Tegon/
 Twitter: https://twitter.com/TegonMaus
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Tegon-Maus/150255051766767
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/tegon/tegon-maus/
 Google+: https://plus.google.com/101974688416833509592/posts

Buy Wishing Stone by Tegon Maus

Amazon (Kindle on sale for only 99 cents through March) Barnes and Noble Smashwords

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